Sporting Breeds

Closely related to the Welsh Springer Spaniel and traditionally used as a medium sized gun dog to help hunt game, the modern English Springer Spaniel has actually been bred into two separate gene pools. Modern show bred English Springer Spaniels and field bred dogs are still registered together, but have had separate bloodlines since the 1950's.

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Traditionally used as gun dogs, the Flat-Coated retriever is a high energy breed from the United Kingdom that has a flat black or liver coat. They make great companions and are fairly easy to train. Sometimes crossbred with Labrador Retrievers, they are a fairly slow maturing breed that may not reach adulthood until 5 years of age.

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The Golden Retriever is a gorgeous, large, and energetic breed. They are the world's foremost family pet and companion. They are sturdy, well proportioned, and are well known for their hunting capabilities on land and in the water. The Golden is perceptive and agile.

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More commonly known as just a "Lab", the Labrador Retriever is an extremely versatile breed and is currently the most popular breed in North America and the United Kingdom. Labs are extremely friendly, loyal, and trainable which not only makes them fantastic companion dogs but also great therapy dogs to assist individuals with special needs.

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Vizsla dogs are originally from Hungary and are a part of the sporting group. They are natural hunters and have a great sense of smell that makes them suitable for hunting Pheasants and fowl. With short coat that's copper brownish in color Vizslas look similar to a couple other pointing breeds, the Weimaraner and Rhodesian Ridgeback.

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Originating from Germany, Weimaraners were historically bred as hunting dogs for deer, bears, and boars. They are known as an energetic breed perfect for hunting, tracking, pointing and retrieving. Their slender body, shiny grey coat, and light blue eyes gives them a unique regal appearance. Weimaraners will traditionally be found with docked tails, although many countries have banned the practice of docking in recent years due to its inhumane practice. The average Wimaraner will weigh roughly 75 pounds (35 kg) and live between 11 and 14 years.

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